Parks Faculty

Mark McQuilling, Ph.D.,<br/>Associate Professor

Mark McQuilling, Ph.D.,
Associate Professor

Associate Professor and Associate Chair Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering

Phone:
(314) 977-8209
Education:

Ph.D. in Engineering

Wright State University

MS in Mechanical Engineering

University of Kentucky

BS in Mechanical Engineering

University of Kentucky

Dr. McQuilling is an Assistant Professor of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at Parks College of Engineering, Aviation and Technology at Saint Louis University.  His research includes studying experimental fluid mechanics, high-lift low-pressure turbine airfoil design, low-Reynolds number fluid mechanics, flow control, parachute aerodynamics and bio-fluid flows.

Prior to coming to Parks Mark was a Student Contractor Engineer in the Air Force Research Laboratory at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio. His research there included high-lift, low-pressure turbine airfoil design and validation in addition to non-intrusive measurement techniques.

Professional Memberships & Associations

McQuilling is a member of the following professional organizations: the Center for Fluids at All Scales (CFAS) at Saint Louis University.,  the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Member (ASME) and the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE).

Research Areas

  • Aerodynamics of Airdrop Systems
  • Airfoil Design and Flow Control at Low Reynolds Number
  • Using Computational Fluid Dynamics in the Medical Field

Research Interests

Dr. McQuilling’s research interests include experimental fluid mechanics, low Reynolds number flows, laminar-to-turbulent transition, airfoil design (low-pressure turbine and low Reynolds number wings), unsteady aerodynamics (turbomachinery and airdrop systems), bio-fluid flows, and flow control.

Graduate Students Supervised

  • Bryan Arko (MSE 2012)
  • Nicholas Freed (MSE 2013)
  • Chad Andrews (MSE 2013)
  • Miranda Turlin (MSE 2014)
  • Ashley Cox (Ph.D. 2015)
  • Pengjie Jiang (Ph.D. 2015)
  • Michael Ponder (Ph.D. 2016)

Undergraduate Students Supervised

  • Ben Koukol (BSAE 2008)
  • Brandon Smith (BSAE 2008)
  • Christian Chanin (BSAE 2008)
  • Michael Dunning (BSAE 2009)
  • Alba Calderón (BSME 2009)
  • Patrick Durnan (BSME 2009)
  • John Huynh (MS Dentistry 2009)
  • Bryan Barrett (BSAE 2010)
  • Nicholas Freed (BSAE 2010, MSE 2013)
  • Lauren Lobosky (BSAE 2010)
  • Steven Sander (BSAE 2010)
  • Sally Warning (BSAE 2010, Ph.D. 2015)
  • Cory Drake (MS Dentistry 2010)
  • Andrew Fields (BSAE 2011)
  • Frank Kody (BSAE 2011)
  • Jordan Null (BSAE 2012)
  • Miranda Turlin (BSAE 2012, MSE 2014)
  • Ignacio Soriano (BSAE 2012)
  • Bryan Arko (MSE 2012)
  • Chad Andrews (MSE 2013)
  • Patrick Riordin (BSAE 2012)
  • Kevin Keadle (BSAE 2013)
  • Walter Hunt (BSAE 2013)
  • Jeremy Payne (BSAE 2013)
  • Kevan Ghobadi (BSAE 2013)
  • Ellen Pifer (BSAE 2013)
  • Phillip Reyes (BSAE 2013)
  • Joe Kavanaugh (BS Physics 2013)
  • Patrick McShane (MS Dentistry 2013)
  • Deanna Lim (BSAE 2015)
  • Benjamin Lund (BSME 2014)
  • Michael Wieler (BSME 2013)
  • Hui Jiang (Ph.D. 2015)
  • Pengjie Jiang (Ph.D. 2015)
  • Michael Ponder (Ph.D. 2016)
  • Ashley Cox (Ph.D. 2015)

Below is a list of Mark McQuilling’s selected publications. For more information on each publication, please visit the Parks College Publication Database.

Printed Archival Peer-Reviewed Journals
  • Combes, T., Malik, A.S., Bramesfeld, G., McQuilling, M. (2013). Efficient Fluid-Structure Interaction Method for Conceptual Design of Flexible, Fixed-Wing Micro Air Vehicle Wings, AIAA Journal. (under review)
  • Arko, B., and McQuilling, M.  “Computational Study of High Lift Low Pressure Turbine Cascade Aerodynamics at Low Reynolds Number,” Journal of Propulsion and Power, 29(2), 446-459, March-April 2013; doi: 10.2514/1.B34576
  • Lyall, M., King, P., Sondergaard, R., Clark, J., and McQuilling, M.  “An Investigation of Reynolds Lapse Rate for Highly Loaded Low Pressure Turbine Airfoils with Forward and Aft Loading,” Journal of Turbomachinery, 134, 051028-1 to 051028-9, September 2012; doi: 10.1115/1.4004826
  • McQuilling, M., and Potvin, J.  “Effect of the Transient Nature of Flow on Annular Parachute Drag Prediction,” Journal of Aircraft, 49(2), 566-575, March-April 2012; doi: 10.2514/1.C031591
  • Jayaram, S., McQuilling, M., and Condoor, S.  “PRO/MECHANICA-based Structural and Random Vibration Analysis of Picosatellite Structure,” International Journal of Computer Aided Engineering and Technology, 4(1), 90-100, January 2012; doi: 10.1504/IJCAET.2012.044585
  • McQuilling, M., Potvin, J., and Riley, J.  “Simulating the Flows About Cargo Containers Used During Parachute Airdrop Operations,” Journal of Aircraft, 48(4), 1405-1411, July-August 2011; doi: 10.2514/1.C031299
  • McQuilling, M., Lobosky, L., and Sander, S.  “Computational Investigation of Flow Around a Parachute Model,” Journal of Aircraft, 48(1), 34-41, January-February 2011; doi: 10.2514/1.46255
  • McQuilling, M., Wolff, M., Fonov, S., Crafton, J., and Sondergaard, R. “An Experimental Investigation of a High-Lift LPT Suction Surface,” AIAA Journal, 48(11), 2465-2471, November 2010; doi: 10.2514/1.37579
  • Huynh, J., Kim, K., and McQuilling, M.  “Pharyngeal Airflow Analysis in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients Pre- and Post-Maxillomandibular Advancement Surgery,” Journal of Fluids Engineering, 131(9), 091101-1 to 091101-10, September 2009; doi: 10.1115/1.3192137
  • McQuilling, M., Wolff, M., Fonov, S., Crafton, J., and Sondergaard, R. “An experimental investigation of a low-pressure turbine blade suction surface using a shear and stress sensitive film,” Experiments in Fluids, 44(1), 73-88, January 2008; doi: 10.1007/s00348-007-0375-2
Peer-Reviewed Conference Papers
  • Keadle, K., and McQuilling, M. “Evaluation of RANS Transition Modeling for High Lift LPT Flows at Low Reynolds Number,” ASME paper GT2013-95069, presented at the ASME International Gas Turbine Institute Turbo Expo 2013, San Antonio, TX, June 3-7, 2013.
  • Potvin, J., Kavanaugh, J., and McQuilling, M.  “A Second Look at Geometric Porosity as Revealed by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD),” AIAA-2013-1320, presented at the 22nd AIAA Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Technology Conference, Daytona Beach, FL, March 25-28, 2013.
  • Freed, N., McQuilling, M., and Potvin, J.  “Investigation of Outer Ring Aerodynamics of an Annular Parachute,” AIAA-2013-1280, presented at the 22nd AIAA Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Technology Conference, Daytona Beach, FL, March 25-28, 2013.
  • Hobadi, K., Pifer, E., LeBeau, R., Bramesfeld, G., and McQuilling, M.  “A Computational and Experimental Investigation of Flow Over an Inflatable Wing,” AIAA-2012-2899, presented at the 30th AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference, New Orleans, LA, June 25-28, 2012.
  • McQuilling, M., and Potvin, J.  “Forebody Wake Effects on the Aerodynamics of an Annular Parachute,” AIAA-2012-3332, presented at the 30th AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference, New Orleans, LA, June 25-28, 2012.
  • Null, J., and McQuilling, M.  “Comparison of Intermittency Detection Algorithms in a Transitional Boundary Layer,” AIAA-2012-0749, presented at the 50th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Nashville, TN, January 9-12, 2012.
  • Arko, B., and McQuilling, M.  “Computational Study of High Lift Low-Pressure Turbine Cascade Aerodynamics at Low Reynolds Number,” AIAA-2012-0938, presented at the 50th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Nashville, TN, January 9-12, 2012.
  • McQuilling, M., and Potvin, J.  “Effect of Transient Nature of Flow on Annular Parachute Drag Prediction,” AIAA-2011-3704, presented at the 20th AIAA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference, Honolulu, HI, June 27-30, 2011.
  • Lyall, M., King, P., Sondergaard, R., Clark, J., and McQuilling, M.  “An Investigation of Reynolds Lapse Rate for Highly Loaded Low Pressure Turbine Airfoils with Forward and Aft Loading,” ASME paper GT2011-46328, presented at the ASME Turbo Expo, Vancouver, Canada, June 6-10, 2011.
  • Potvin, J., and McQuilling, M.  “The Bi-model: Using CFD to support the simulations of low-porosity hemispherical parachutes inflating slowly,” AIAA-2011-2542, presented at the 21st AIAA Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Technology Conference and Seminar, Dublin, Ireland, May 23-26, 2011.
  • Riley, J., Sadeck, J., Desabrais, K., Lee, C., Noetscher, G., and McQuilling, M.  “Concentric Annular Parachute Systems,” AIAA-2011-2532, presented at the 21st AIAA Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Technology Conference and Seminar, Dublin, Ireland, May 23-26, 2011.
  • Potvin, J., Bergeron, K., Brown, G., Charles, R., Desabrais, K., Johari, H., Kumar, V., McQuilling, M., Morris, A., Noetshcer, G., and Tutt, B.  “The Road Ahead: A White Paper on the Development, Testing, and Use of Advanced Numerical Modeling for Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Design and Analysis,” AIAA-2011-2501, presented at the 21st AIAA Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Technology Conference and Seminar, Dublin, Ireland, May 23-26, 2011.
  • McQuilling, M., Potvin, J., and Riley, J.  “Simulating the Flows About Cargo Containers Used During Parachute Airdrop Operations,” AIAA-2010-4565, presented at the 28th AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference, Chicago, IL, June 28 - July 1, 2010.
  • Lobosky, L., Sander, S., and McQuilling, M.  “Computational Investigation of the Unsteady Flow Around a Parachute Model,” AIAA-2009-3978, presented at the 3rd AIAA CFD Student Paper Competition of the 19th AIAA CFD Conference, San Antonio, TX, June 22-25, 2009.
  • Condoor, S., and McQuilling, M.  “Incorporating Entrepreneurial Mindset in the Freshman Engineering Students,” AC-2009-1826, presented at the ASEE Annual Conference, Austin, TX, June 14-17, 2009.
  • McQuilling, M., Wolff, M., Fonov, S., Crafton, J., and Sondergaard, R. “An Experimental Investigation of Suction Surface Flow Features on a High-Lift LPT,” AIAA-2008-0079, presented at the 46th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, Reno, NV, January 7-10, 2008.
Conference Abstracts
  • Arko, B., and McQuilling, M. “Computational Study of High Lift LPT Cascade Aerodynamics,” presented at the 36th Annual Dayton-Cincinnati Aerospace Sciences Symposium, Dayton, OH, March 1, 2011.
  • Freed, N., McQuilling, M., and Potvin, J. “Annular Parachute Aerodynamics: What’s the Big Deal?” presented at the 36th Annual Dayton-Cincinnati Aerospace Sciences Symposium, Dayton, OH, March 1, 2011.
  • Lyall, M.E., King, P.I., Sondergaard, R., Clark, J.P., and McQuilling, M.  “Low Reynolds Number Loss Behavior of Highly Loaded Low Pressure Turbine Airfoils with Forward and Aft Loading,” presented at the 36th Annual Dayton-Cincinnati Aerospace Sciences Symposium, Dayton, OH, March 1, 2011.
  • Null, J., and McQuilling, M.  “Comparison of Intermittency Detection Algorithms in a Transitional Boundary Layer,” presented at the 63rd Annual Meeting of the American Physical Society – Division of Fluid Dynamics, Long Beach, CA, November 21-23, 2010.
Conference Posters
  • Potvin, J., Reyes, P., McQuilling, M., Goldbogen, J.A., and Shadwick, R.E.  “Hydrodynamics and body drag properties of Rorqual whales during non-feeding transport, as revealed by Computational Fluid Dynamics,” presented at the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology’s Annual Meeting 2013, San Francisco, CA, January 3-7, 2013.
  • Rifkin, R., McQuilling, M., Turlin, M., and Wendl, M.  “Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of the Impact of Obtuse Leaflet Angulation on Isovelocity Surface Calculation of Orifice Area in Mitral Regurgitation,” presented at the 23rd Annual Scientific Sessions of the American Society of Echocardiography, National Harbor, MD, June 30 - July 3, 2012.

Fluid Systems Laboratory

Subsonic Wind Tunnel

  • There is a 28x40 inch closed-throat, open circuit low speed wind tunnel, that is capable of continuous air speeds up to 150 mph. A six component strain gauge balance with  computerized data acquisition and analysis using LabVIEW is available. A helium bubble generator unit is available for flow visualization studies. A Laser Doppler Velocimetry system is available for flow measurements. This facility is utilized for undergraduate laboratory instruction. Students and faculty use this facility for model testing and experimental research. This facility is also used for graduate research as well as externally funded research.

  • There is a 12X12 inch closed-throat, open circuit low speed wind tunnel, that is capable of air speeds up to 120 mph. A four component strain gage balance is available for measuring forces on a sting mounted model. This facility is primarily used for undergraduate laboratory instruction.

Supersonic Wind Tunnel

  • There is a 4x4 inch supersonic blow down wind tunnel with speed to Mach 4. A four component strain gauge balance and computerized data reduction system is available. Flow visualization in the supersonic wind tunnel is done through a Schlieren Optical System. This facility is used primarily for undergraduate laboratory instruction.

Water Tunnel

  • There is a water tunnel (Eidetics 1520) for flow visualization studies as well as investigating other fluid flow behavior past bodies. A dynamic model support is available. This facility is used for undergraduate laboratory instruction as well as graduate research. A shear layer water tunnel is also available.

    There exists a state of the art Digital Particle Image Velocimetry System (DPIV) along with high-speed data acquisition system for flow visualization & analysis in the two water tunnels.

Thermal System Laboratory

Thermal-Fluid Sciences research efforts at Parks College address a full range of problems, including micro- and nano-scale phenomena and galaxy-sized events. Research efforts are underway to
simulate the clouds and large vortices that advect in the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune. More accurate aerial delivery is under investigation by studying the aerodynamics of parachutes and airdrop systems. In the area of turbomachinery, current work examines aerodynamic losses produced by turbine blades and vanes, the design of internal cooling schemes for such blades and vanes, and the development of improved means for film cooling, as measured within transonic turbine airfoil cascades using infrared thermography. Also of interest are micro-fluidic phenomena, as well as separation, fractionation, and purification of micro-particles and nano-particles. Unmanned aerial vehicles are also under development, including research on improving wing design and controlling aerodynamic flows. Research on the fundamentals of fluid physics examines means to identify the laminar-to- turbulent transition process, as part of investigations on the overall nature of turbulence itself.